> East Bay Regional Park District | Embrace Life! > Parks > Coyote Hills Regional Park

Park Info

Address
8000 Patterson Ranch Road
Fremont, CA 94555
Download Brochure

Phone Number
Toll Free: 888-EBPARKS (888-327-2757), option 3, extension 4519

Local Weather


Panorama Panorama

Maps
View Trail Map
Download PDF Map
Yahoo Map
Transit & Trails

Park/Gate Hours
Jan. 1 - March. 9
  8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
March 10 - April 20
  8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
April 21 - Sept. 28
  8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Sept. 29 - Oct. 26
  8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Oct. 27 - Dec. 31
  8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Visitor Center:
Wed. - Sun. 10am - 4pm
Closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day

Park Events
Click HERE for upcoming events

Parking Fee
$5 per vehicle; $4 per trailered vehicle. Buses: $25/per bus.

Dog Fee
$2 per dog. Guide/service dogs free. Dogs must be leashed and under control at all times

Grazing Information
Grazing in the Parks

Camping Reservations
1-888-EBPARKS or 1-888-327-2757, press option 2, then 1

Picnic Reservations
1-888-EBPARKS or 1-888-327-2757, press option 2, then 1

Naturalist Programs
510-544-3220
- EBParksOnline (Link)
- Program Guides (PDFs)
- Naturalist-led Program Descriptions (PDF)

For Educators
Plan a field trip to this park

Emergency Number
911

EBRPD Headquarters
1-888-EBPARKS or 1-888-327-2757

See Also
Alameda Creek Trail

Park Update

Trail Update

All trails are open. We ask that all vehicle drivers and bicyclists stay alert for basking gopher snakes and king snakes while driving on the roads. Also beware of slow-moving alligator lizards and new ducklings and goslings. Give them the time they need to cross the roadway.

Grazing Update

The grazing is finished for the season. District Grazing FAQ

Marsh Update

The North Marsh, Main Marsh and the South Marsh are dry or with little water. We ask that park users refrain from leaving the trails and entering any marsh area. Wet or dry, the marshes are a viable and complicated habitat for many invertebrates, as well as birds, turtles, and fish. Entering and walking in a marsh area can cause more damage than one might think possible.

Wildlife Update

Every season brings something new to Coyote Hills and winter is the time for ducks! Despite the lack of winter rains and dry marshes we continue to have a vibrant habitat that provides much needed food and rest for these intrepid birds before they resume their migration to spring nesting grounds.

With the unusually warm and dry winter the garden abounds with active bird life and provides lots of entertainment for those who love observing animal behavior. The garden is open Wednesday through Sunday, from 10am-4pm. Stop by and get to know some feathered friends!

Have a great Winter.

Coyote Hills Regional Park

Coyote Hills Regional Park

About The Park

Coyote Hills Regional Park was dedicated to public use in 1967. Comprised of nearly 978 acres of marshland and rolling grassland covered hills, this busy park is located along the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay, northwest of the cities of Fremont and Newark. The most popular visitor activities by far are bicycling, walking, bird watching, jogging, nature exploration, and picnicking. Well used every season of the year, spring, summer, and fall tend to be the most popular. But the park's winter beauty is wonderful to behold.

Submit Your Photos to the EBRPD Photo Pool

History

The East Bay area's original inhabitants were the ancestors of the Ohlone Indians, hunters and gatherers whose skills enabled them to live well off the land's natural bounty. In those days, tule elk roamed the land, condors soared overhead, and sea otters and fish were abundant in the Bay. At Coyote Hills Regional Park, some of this rich wetland is preserved, along with 2,000-year old Tuibun Ohlone Indian shellmound sites with fascinating archaeological resources.

The park's rich and varied history also includes Mission and settler ranching and farming activities, salt production, a duck hunting club, a dairy, rock quarrying, a military NIKE missile site, and a biosonar research facility. Now a Regional Park, this area is preserved for recreation, and educational and nature experiences for all to enjoy.

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Park Features

Visitor Center

Coyote Hills Visitor Center contains educational displays and exhibits as well as the Possum's Pocket Nature Store. The exhibits portray the Ohlone way of life, and include a tule reed boat constructed by park staff and volunteers using Native American methods. Other exhibits cover the park's natural history and wildlife.

The Coyote Hills Visitor Center is open 10am to 4pm, Wednesday through Sunday.

Note: Some areas of the Visitor Center will be closed for exhibit maintenance during August and early September. Please call ahead before planning a visit. 

Tuibun Ohlone Village Site (previously Native American Archaeological Sites)

Open houses, guided tours, and school programs are offered at a more than 2,000-year-old Tuibun Ohlone Village site. During these programs, visitors can enter an Ohlone-style family house, sweat house, and shade shelter. Public access to the site is by reservation only. Call the visitor center at (510) 544-3220 for information.

Nectar Garden

A bird and butterfly nectar garden is located adjacent to the visitor center. Currently the garden is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 4 pm. Several naturalist-led educational programs are offered in the garden during the year. Contact the interpretive staff at (510) 544-3220 for additional information. 

Picnic Areas

The park offers two first-come-first-served picnic areas. One located at the visitor center, the other at the Quarry Staging Area. Both have picnic tables, barbeque braziers, water, and shade. A reservable group picnic area is also available at Hoot Hollow. 

Group Camps

One reservable group camping site is available at Dairy Glen. Picnic tables, braziers, a campfire ring, water and shade are available. Chemical toilets are also provided. 

One reservable group camping site is available at Dairy Glen. This 50-person group camp, named after the dairy farmers of the 1800s, has recently been completely upgraded and renovated thanks to funding from the Regional Parks Foundation. The group camp now includes three shade structures, additional picnic tables, a drinking foundation, fire pit, hand washing station and vault toilets. Upgrades created greater accessibility so the campsite is now fully ADA compliant including a new hardened path that makes it easier for guests using wheelchairs and mobility devices to access the shade structures and other components of the camp. 

Wildlife Refuge

The waters to the west and south of Coyote Hills are part of the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Shoreline, No Name, Apay Way and Alameda Creek trails provide access to the Refuge for hikers and bicycle riders. Apay Way leads to the Refuge Visitor Center via a bridge over the top of the Highway 84/Dumbarton Bridge toll booths. 

Alameda Creek Trail

This 12-mile trail stretches from the Bay east to the mouth of Niles Canyon, and borders Coyote Hills on the park's north side. It is actually two parallel trails, with an equestrian trail on the northern levee and a bicycle trail on the southern levee, connecting with the Coyote Hills' Bay View bike trail. Hikers are welcome on both trails. Motor vehicles are not permitted on the trails--citations will be issued to violators.

Other attractions at Coyote Hills include the Marsh Boardwalk, and 3.5-mile Bay View Trail, a paved loop trail for hiking and bicycle riding. There are scenic views of the South Bay from the park's hilltops.

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Park Activities

Naturalist Programs

The park's naturalist staff conducts a variety of programs for both organized groups and the public. Programs are offered on a variety of subjects including, Native American history and culture, birds and butterflies, marsh and grassland ecology, and general nature exploration. Public programs, usually on weekends, are publicized in the Park District's monthly newsletter, Regional In Nature, which is available in the visitor center and posted on park bulletin boards. Weekday programs are available for schools and organized groups by reservation. Call (510) 544-3220 for further information.

For detailed description of the Coyote Hills Naturalist Programs, click here.

Nature Study

In addition to taking part in the naturalist programs publicized on park bulletin boards and in the Park District's monthly newsletter, you may want to strike out on your own. Bringing along a magnifying glass, camera, a pair of binoculars, and maybe a sketch book will help to enhance your experience. Remember to wear sturdy walking shoes and bring liquids and a snack. Information about what to see and where to go is available in the visitor center.

Picnicking

Numerous picnic tables are located at the visitor center and at the Quarry Staging Area on a first-come-first-served basis. Cooking fires are limited to the metal braziers provided at each site. The Hoot Hollow picnic area, located above and behind the visitor center, is a reservable group picnic site. Telephone 1-888-EBPARKS or 1-888-327-2757 (press option 2, then 1) for further information.

Camping

The Dairy Glen reservable group campsite is available for overnight camping through the Park District's Reservations office. Call 1-888-EBPARKS or 1-888-327-2757 (press option 2, then 1) for reservations. All reservations must be made at least 14 days in advance.

Hiking

Hikes through Coyote Hills afford scenic vistas of San Francisco Bay and surrounding areas of Southern Alameda County. Ramble 'round a marsh or climb to the top of Red Hill to catch the breeze. For detailed information on trail lengths and terrain, see the park map or talk with staff in the visitor center. Other attractions of interest include the Marsh Boardwalk and the 3.5-mile Bayview Trail, a paved loop trail for hiking and bicycle riding. There are wonderful scenic views of San Francisco Bay and the peninsula hills to the west from the park's hilltops.

Bicycling

Bike riders may take the 3.5-mile paved Bayview Trail within the park. Bayview connects with 12 additional miles of trail along the south levee of the Alameda Creek Trail, and to the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

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ADA accessibility iconPark Accessibility

There are two disabled parking sites at the Visitor Center's parking lot. Both of the public restrooms at the Center have an accessible stall. Current drinking fountains are of the older style and work well for some, but not all wheelchair users. Both drinking fountains will be upgraded this summer. There is one wheelchair accessible chemical toilet in the Center's parking lot and one at the Quarry Staging Area. One of the drinking fountains in the Quarry parking lot is scheduled to be upgraded no latter than this fall.

Trail Accessibility Reports

Click here for public transit information.

 

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To Reach The Park

Coyote Hills Regional Park is located at 8000 Patterson Ranch Road, Fremont, CA 94555. The closest BART station is the Union City BART station. The park's main entrance is at the west end of Patterson Ranch Road/Commerce Drive in Fremont. From I-880, take Highway 84 west, exit at Paseo Padre Parkway, turn right, and drive north about one mile. Turn left on Patterson Ranch Road. This is the park's entrance road and will take you to the picnic areas and visitor center. Parking fees may apply.

Click here for public transit information or call 511 (TDD (hearing impaired line)/TTY: 1-800-448-9790) to confirm transit information.

Transit & Trails: Coyote Hills Regional Park (transit, biking, and walking directions) 

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Trail Map

Click the map image below to see an enlarged version.

Trail Map

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Directions for navigating the enlarged map:

When the enlarged version of the map opens click on the 'Full Expand' icon in the lower right hand corner of the map to see the 'Actual Size' map.

'Full Expand' icon > Full Expand

When the 'Actual Size' map is viewable, you can 'Click-Hold and Drag' the mouse button (left on a PC) to reposition the map, as desired.

'Single-Click' on the 'Enlarged' or 'Actual Size' map to return to the park page.

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Interpretive Panels

CH A Convergance t

A Convergence Of People and Wildlife

  
CH Crystaline Gold t

The South Bay's Rush for Crystalline Gold