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East Bay Skyline National Recreation Trail

Trail Info

Address:
See: Trail Map
Download Brochure

Parking Fee
No fees

Hours
Open between 5am and 10pm unless otherwise posted or permitted

Phone Number
Toll Free: 888-EBPARKS (888-327-2757)

Maps
Trail Map
Download PDF Map

East Bay Skyline National Trail Photo

About The Trail

The East Bay Skyline National Recreation Trail, one of 1,200 designated National Recreation Trails in the United States, is part of the historic 1968 National Trails System Act. The trail parallels the Bay Area Ridge Trail, a planned 550-mile multi-use trail along ridgelines ringing the San Francisco Bay Area, and the Anza National Historic Trail, commemorating the 1776 East Bay exploration by Lt. Colonel Juan Bautista de Anza’s expedition.

The East Bay Skyline National Recreation Trail (Skyline Trail) offers one of the most unique and rewarding outdoor trail experiences in the San Francisco Bay Area. A 31-mile continuous path, the Skyline Trail traverses through six of the East Bay’s most historic and picturesque parks and preserves, sometimes just steps away from urban areas. Visitors will encounter many delights along the trail including stunning panoramic city and bay views, the largest remaining natural stand of coast redwood found in the East Bay and historic and geologic resources.

Running north to south, the trail begins at historic Alvarado Park and the entrance to Wildcat Canyon Regional Park in Richmond.

From there it leads through Tilden Regional Park, Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve, Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve, Redwood Regional Park, and ends at Proctor Gate staging area at Anthony Chabot Regional Park
near Castro Valley. There is also a section that crosses East Bay Municipal Utility District land over the Caldecott Tunnel and Highway 24.

The Skyline Trail truly embodies the spirit of the National Trails System Act of 1968 (trails50.org) which is celebrating 50 years of creating outdoor recreation opportunities, promoting resource preservation, providing public access, and appreciating the great outdoors and America’s history and cultural diversity.

2018 is the 50th Anniversary of the National Trails System Act

National Trails System Act LogoIn his 1965 “Natural Beauty Message” to Congress, President Lyndon B. Johnson inspired a national “system of trails” for the American people. Congress passed the National Trails System Act, signed into law by President Johnson on October 2, 1968. Today, the National Trails System includes 11 National Scenic Trails and 19 National Historic Trails authorized by Congress, and more than 1,200 National Recreation Trails including the East Bay Skyline National Recreation Trail. Source: Partnership for the National Trail System

Mileage

Trail Mileage Guide

Trail Accessibility

East Bay Skyline National Recreation Trail is not wheelchair accessible.

Responsible Trail-Use Rules

Multi-Use Trail

Safe multiple use of this and other multiple use trails requires everyone's cooperation. Each trail user is asked to exercise common courtesy. BICYCLES YIELD to horses and hikers. HIKERS YIELD to horses. Stay to the right of the trail except when passing. NO MOTORIZED VEHICLES are permitted on the trail, wheelchairs excepted.

Violations of any of the following may result in citation.

All Trail Users

  • Be safe, considerate and aware of your impact on the trail and other trail users.
  • For everyone's safety, keep to the right. Proceed single file around blind curves.
  • For your safety, headphones are not advised.
  • Safety helmets are required by law for bicyclists under age 18, and are strongly recommended for all bicyclists and equestrians.
  • Dogs must be on leash where posted, and under full verbal control elsewhere. Please clean up after your dog.

Bicycles

  • Bicycles are permitted on designated trails only. Horses have the right-of-way on trails.
  • Bicycles shall not be ridden at an unsafe speed, or greater than the posted speed limit. Be aware of how you are perceived by other trail users.
  • Bells are required on bicycles on Park District trails.
  • Bicycles always yield to pedestrians. Before passing, SLOW DOWN, ring bell and establish verbal contact.
  • When approaching equestrians, call out, ring bell and STOP, whether you are seen or not. Ask for instructions on how to pass safely.
  • On blind turns, SLOW DOWN, call out, ring bell and ride single file.

Pedestrians

  • Keep to the right when approached by others.
  • Always yield to equestrians.
  • Look behind and to both sides before changing course.

Equestrians

  • Keep your horse to the right or where safe when encountering other trail users.
  • Communicate. Let other trail users know how to pass your horse safely.
  • Please clean up after your horse on paved trails.

In case of emergency dial 9-1-1.
Trail conflicts or violations should be reported to the Trail Hotline at  (510) 733-6991
For an immediate response, call  (510) 881-1833.

Trail Map

Map - Northern Segment

Click the map image below to see an enlarged version.
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Map - Southern Segment

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