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Archery is one of the many recreational pastimes enjoyed in the regional parks. The Redwood Bowman Site in Oakland's Redwood Regional Park first was a local favorite for fifty years. Photo circa 1950.
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Horsemen engage in a trail ride during the 1950s through Grass Valley area, now Anthony Chabot Regional Park.
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Park District Director Thomas J. Roberts (center) and Elbert Vail, first Park District Manager stand with staff from the Civilian Conservation Corps camp that operated in the Tilden Nature Area (Camp Wildcat) from 1935 to 1942. CCC workers were instrumental in several park construction projects including Temescal Beach House in Oakland, Alvarado Park in Richmond, and Tilden in Berkeley. Photo circa 1945.
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One hundred giant sequoia seedlings were planted along Nimitz Way trail in Tilden Regional Park in 1950 by members of the Berkeley Hiking Club, in whose honor the new grove was named. Left to right, Fred Morath, Richard E. Walpole, general manager of the East Bay Regional Park District, Lora Jane Hall, Doyle L. Youngs, president of the hiking club; Nancy Harrison, and Charles W. Knights, club director.
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Volunteer "Conductor" Victor Shattock, shown in 1953 with grandsons Kenneth and James Shattock, get ready for an "at speed" run on the Golden Gate Live Steamers layout at Redwood Regional Park on a gleaming 4-6-2 wheel arrangement miniature steam locomotive.
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Young anglers David Tryon, 7, of Berkeley and Erick Paumblad, 5, of Kensington show off trout caught in the Tilden Trout Pond during the 1950s.
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Early Naturalist Jack Parker talks piglets with two young park visitors to the Tilden Little Farm. The farm was completed in 1955 by Berkeley High School carpentry students with support from the Berkeley Kiwanis Club.
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The Regional Parks first Chief of Interpretive Services Christian Nelson shows park visitors how to use a self-guiding wildflower book developed for Briones Regional Park in 1973.
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Mother and toddler ride a proudly painted steed on the Merry-Go-Round that operated during the early 1950s at Roberts Regional Recreation Area, Oakland. The popular carousel was dismantled and relocated to the Oakland Zoo.
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The Regional Parks first employee Wes Adams, is shown here doing maintenance on the Brazil Building in Tilden Regional Park District. Today, the Brazil Building is a favorite wedding and special event location in part because of its beautifully reconstructed exterior from portions of the Brazilian Pavilion at the Worlds Fair on Treasure Island. The building was gifted to the Park District from Brazilian officials after the Worldʼs Fair in 1939.
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Once considered the Coney Island of the West, Alameda Shoreline and Crown Memorial State Beach were previously known as Neptune Beach from the 1880s until the outbreak of WWII and was the place to come in the East Bay for exciting roller coaster rides, a dip in the giant size pool and the largest beach in the San Francisco Bay.
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(Left to Right) Mrs. Charles Lee Tilden, Mark Green, Superintendent Tilden Regional Park, and Major Charles Lee Tilden, President East Bay Regional Park Board, planted redwood trees with the Campfire Girls of Oakland in honor of Mr. Tildenʼs 83rd birthday in 1940.
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Set in the heart of Oakland, Temescal Regional Recreation Area maintains its popularity even today due to its beautiful architecture, tranquility and recreational amenities.
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Family outings are best with the picnic tradition of roasted hotdogs as seen here at Redwood Regional Park. Photo circa 1950s.
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The Redwood Valley Railway, often dubbed the "Little Train" and operated exclusively by dedicated volunteer railroad buffs has been a Tilden Regional Park tradition and one of the most remembered amusements in the Regional Parks since the early 1950s.
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